Can a debt incurred as part of the purchase price of a property be traced to the property?

Ontario, Canada


The following excerpt is from Booth v. Booth, 2003 CanLII 2064 (ON SC):

Cases have held that if a debt incurred as part of a purchase price of property is discharged with “excluded funds” the money can be traced to the property in the same way as if it was used to purchase the property. (see Allgeier v. Allgeier [1996] O.J. No. 3956.)

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