Does not being able to drive make Elisha less marketable or attractive to employers?

British Columbia, Canada


The following excerpt is from Singh v. Bevan, 2016 BCSC 1412 (CanLII):

The defendant submits not being able to drive is not a “capital asset” that is compensable. I do not agree. Turning to the Brown v. Golaiy factors, I find not being able to drive will make Elisha less marketable or attractive to employers and will limit the job opportunities that might otherwise have been available to her. It also makes her less capable overall of earning income for all types of employment.

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